Methods for Managing Weeds in Wildlands

Biological Control

Biological control is a non-chemical management technique that uses naturally-occurring host-specific insects, mites or pathogens to help control invasive species. Biological control can be very cost-effective, but this approach is limited to those weeds for which safe biological control agents have been identified, tested, and authorized, and does not result in full eradication. See the Overview of Biological Control for background on the technique, definitions for commonly-used terms, and explanation of the safeguards used to make sure control agents are safe.

Bull thistle

Bull thistle

Cirsium vulgare

Canada thistle

Canada thistle

Cirsium arvense

Cape-ivy

Cape-ivy

Delairea odorata

Dalmatian toadflax

Dalmatian toadflax

Linaria dalmatica ssp. dalmatica

Giant reed

Giant reed

Arundo donax

Gorse

Gorse

Ulex europaeus

Italian thistle

Italian thistle

Carduus pycnocephalus

Knapweeds

Knapweeds

Centaurea spp.

Mediterranean sage

Mediterranean sage

Salvia aethiopis

Milk thistle

Milk thistle

Silybum marianum

Musk thistle

Musk thistle

Carduus nutans

Puncture vine

Puncture vine

Tribulus terrestris

Purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife

Lythrum salicaria

Rush skeleton weed

Rush skeleton weed

Chondrilla juncea

Russian knapweed

Russian knapweed

Acroptilon repens

Saltcedar

Saltcedar

Tamarix ramosissima

Scotch broom

Scotch broom

Cytisus scoparius

St. Johnswort

St. Johnswort

Hypericum perforatum

Tansy ragwort

Tansy ragwort

Senecio jacobaea

Yellow starthistle

Yellow starthistle

Centaurea solstitialis

()